As the goblin population boomed in the last half of the 11th century, they began to put pressure on the Muslim Caliphates of the Middle East. The Caliphs responded by declaring jihad against the goblins, and threw their resources at the hordes. Consequently, the focus of the Muslim armies was driving the goblin horde into the sea from Jerusalem, and the desert from Cairo, and not providing secure routes to and from Christian Holy sites and centers of trade. Further, Hobgoblins from the central Asian Steppe began threatening Constantinople. These two events resulted in a call by the Byzantine Emperor, and echoed by the Pope, for European military action to restore stability to the region. Exploiting the advantages offered by rampaging hordes of marauding goblins, the European Crusaders were able to “stabilize” most of the Levant, establishing the Crusader States: the Kingdom of Jerusalem, the County of Tripoli, the Principality of Antioch, and others. Most of the region’s major settlements were captured not from the Muslims, but from goblins that had sacked the cities left vulnerable by conscription. Now, almost a century later, tensions are rising between Muslim and Christian. The goblin horde has been well and truly broken, and many question the reasons behind a continued European presence in the Holy Land. Never mind that most of the “Europeans” that now occupy the Crusader States were born there…